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Biomedical Engineering MSE

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Contact Biomedical Engineering Admissions

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Maria Steele

Senior Academic Advisor/Counselor

Jan Stegemann
Jan Stegemann

Associate Chair for the Master’s Program

Biomedical at Michigan Statistics

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#9

US News and World Report

50.3%

female (Winter 2019)

36

core faculty

95

affiliated faculty across the University

Top 10

Engineering, Medical, and Business School on the same campus

6

cutting edge areas of concentration

Why get your Biomedical master's degree at Michigan?

Uniquely positioned as a joint department between Michigan Medicine and Michigan Engineering

Students have plentiful opportunities to work within the hospital. We also have outstanding resources and infrastructure for master’s study, including the Center for Entrepreneurship, the Coulter Translational Partnership, and Fast Forward Medical Innovation. In addition, the University hosts a wide range of research institutes and core facilities.

Female student experimenting in lab
Photo of Biomedical Engineering Building on North Campus

What can you do with an MSE in Biomedical Engineering?

A master’s degree in Biomedical Engineering provides advanced preparation for you to make an impact on your career.

The Michigan BME master’s program provides the opportunity to specialize in one of six areas that reflect the cutting edge in biomedical engineering. Master’s students take advanced courses, gain hands-on laboratory and product development experience, and receive professional training to enhance their effectiveness as they progress through their careers. 

Female student viewing microscope
Pills in a petri dish

BME Graduate Curriculum

The BME graduate curriculum allows students to delve deeply into their area of interest, while also providing advanced training in engineering fundamentals. Individualized plans of study will be developed by students in consultation with a faculty advisor. Refer to the Bulletin for course descriptions.

Align your interest

An advanced degree in biomedical engineering offers courses that allow students to align their interest with one of six concentrations.

Student studying biomedically engineered hand

Master’s graduates are prepared for a wide range of jobs in medically-oriented industries, including biotechnology, pharmaceuticals, and medical devices.

In addition, the MS degree is excellent preparation for further study in graduate school or medical school.

Biomedical Engineering Student

Bioelectrics and Neural Engineering

Bioelectrics is the study of electrical fields and potentials within the body. In the bioelectrical concentration, students learn how to examine and control these fields towards developing medical devices and restorative therapies. Neural engineering seeks to understand the function of the nervous system and to apply this knowledge to developing new devices and therapies.

Experiment in a biomedical engineering labratory

Biomaterials and Regenerative Medicine

Biomaterials is the study of interactions between living and non-living materials. Biomaterials are an integral component in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. The field of biomaterials encompasses the design of orthopaedic, dental, cardiovascular and neuro-sensory prostheses, artificial organs, blood-surface interactions, cellular and tissue engineering, drug delivery, biosensors, microencapsulation technology, and implant retrieval analysis.

Biomedical imaging

Biomedical Imaging and Ultrasonics

Biomedical imaging scientists and engineers must understand the basic physics and operating principles of all primary modalities including magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), radiography and nuclear medicine, optics, and ultrasound. The biomedical imaging curriculum recognizes trends and requires students to have a solid background in signal processing and imaging science, and simultaneously be literate in both the basic life sciences and the basic operating principles of several imaging modalities.

Students studying biotechnology

Biotechnology and Systems Biology

Advances in cellular and molecular biology have changed and expanded the ways therapeutic devices and drugs are designed. Goals include the production of improved biomaterials for medical implants and prosthetics, tissues engineered for specific functionality, and new therapeutic drugs. The biotechnology curriculum emphasizes critical areas of chemistry, molecular biology, and cell biology, but also exposes students to a broad range of engineering approaches necessary for this interdisciplinary field.

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Biomechanics and Biotransport

Biomechanics is a hybrid discipline requiring a thorough understanding of classic engineering mechanics, physiology and cell biology, and the interface between the two. Biomechanics also has important applications in cutting-edge fields like tissue engineering and mechanotransduction. Mechanotransduction is the study of how cells sense and react to mechanical stimulus, a field with applications in such diverse areas as hearing (hair-cell movement in fluids) and orthopaedics (bone and tendon response to physical stress).

Medical product

Medical Product Development

The goal of this concentration is to provide students with the practical knowledge and skills needed to bring new and improved devices to the clinic, in the context of the current healthcare environment. The core course is a two-semester design-build-test experience in which student teams work to solve real clinical problems in collaboration with practicing physicians. This experience is augmented with elective courses in regulatory affairs, quality systems, intellectual property, innovation, and other topics relevant to the development and commercialization of medical products.

Biomedically engineered device on hand
Blue matter on microscope tray

Sequential Undergraduate/ Graduate Studies Program (SUGS)

Current University of Michigan engineering majors students can complete both your bachelor’s and master’s degrees in only five years with SUGS by taking some graduate-level classes during your undergraduate years, so you can save yourself one semester and complete a master’s with only two additional semesters.

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Practice Your Purpose

There is a rich variety of experiential learning opportunities to help you find your niche, connect with people who share your passion, and gain hands-on experience that’ll set your resumé apart from the stack.

Graduate Student Involvement

BME Graduate Student Council Logo
BME Graduate Student Council

BME Graduate Student Council

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BMES

BMES

Biomedical Engineering Society University of Michigan

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Microfluidics in Biomedical Sciences Student Organization

Microfluidics in Biomedical Sciences Student Organization

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Graduate Design team

Graduate Design team

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Bioethics Discussion Group

Bioethics Discussion Group

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M-Heal
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Cellular Biotechnology Training Program

Cellular Biotechnology Training Program

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TEAM

TEAM

Tissue Engineering and Regeneration Grant

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MBSTP

MBSTP

Microfluidics in Biomedical Sciences Training Program

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Biomedical Research

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Explore all research

Explore all research

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Biomechanics & Mechanobiology

Biomechanics & Mechanobiology

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Computation and Modeling

Computation and Modeling

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Neural Engineering

Neural Engineering

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Micro- and Nanotechnology and Molecular Engineering

Micro- and Nanotechnology and Molecular Engineering

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Imaging and Biophotonics

Imaging and Biophotonics

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Regenerative Medicine

Regenerative Medicine

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Professional Development

Engineering Careers logo
Engineering Career Resource Center (ECRC)

Engineering Career Resource Center (ECRC)

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BME Career Week & Pathways Expo

BME Career Week & Pathways Expo

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Sling Health

Sling Health

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Med Launch

Med Launch

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Research Videos

Alumni Bios

Each of these alumni were once in your shoes, deciding on a master’s degree. Explore their educational path and how it set their life in motion.

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Sakib Elahi

MSE Biomedical Engineering, 2008

Becton Dickinson (BD)

Senior Engineer

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Rachel Sun

MSE Biomedical Engineering, 2019

Pall Corporation

R&D Leadership Associate

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Bill Lloyd

MSE Biomedical Engineering, 2010

Terumo Heart Inc.

Senior Engineer II

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Heidi Nielsen

MSE Biomedical Engineering, 2008

Emergent Biosolutions

Senior Manager, Manufacturing Operations

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Jeffrey Meng

MSE Biomedical Engineering, 2008

U.S. Public Health Service / U.S. Food and Drug Administration

Director of Investigations Branch

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Andrew Scott

MSE Biomedical Engineering, 2001; MHSA Health Management and Policy, 2016

Michigan Energy Department Improvement Collaborative

Program Manager

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Kristen Wolff

MSE Biomedical Engineering, 2008

University of Michigan

Assoc. Director of Licensing, Tech Transfer

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Michael Ron

MSE Biomedical Engineering, 2006

Nuvasive

Staff Quality Engineer

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Mitchell Rohde

MSE Electrical Engineering Systems, 1996; MSE Biomedical Engineering, 1997

Quantum Signal

Chief Executive Officer (CEO)

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Sahar Rahmani

MSE Biomedical Engineering, 2011

Gilead Sciences

Research Scientist

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Scott Merz

MS Biomedical Engineering, 1989

MC3 Cardiopulmonary

President & CEO

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Sakib Elahi

University of Michigan, BSE Mechanical Engineering, 2006

University of Michigan, MSE Biomedical Engineering, 2008

University of Michigan, Ph.D. Biomedical Engineering, 2014

Becton Dickinson (BD)

Senior Engineer

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Career Summary

After completing my Ph.D. at U-M, I built on my expertise in Biomedical Optics, which was the topic of my thesis.  I took a postdoctoral research position at Texas A&M in a lab that was developing non-invasive glucose sensing technology.  These fully implantable sensors sat 5 mm below the skin, and I was developing a wearable detector (like a wristband) that could read the signal from the sensor.  Continuous glucose monitoring without the need for a finger-prick blood measurement could greatly improve the lifestyle of diabetic patients, and alert them of sudden drops or spikes in blood sugar.  Our research group collaborated with a start-up company that was working on commercializing the technology.  This exposure taught me more about the business aspects of medical technology development. 

After 2 years at Texas A&M, I accepted a position at the large medical technology company Becton Dickinson (BD).  I continued working in the Diabetes field in my first role at BD, which was in Durham, North Carolina.  Type 1 diabetics often wear catheters that continuously infuse insulin in their abdomen.  I was working on reducing the inflammation that was incited by these insulin infusion sets, which would allow them to be worn longer before changing the catheter.  Working in a large company taught me a different work culture.  This was faster-paced, and I had more resources at my disposal.  Rather than executing the scientific work myself, I was planning experiments and generating new ideas, and collaborating with smaller companies and universities to conduct the work.

I then moved to another role in BD, this time located in Vernon Hills, Illinois.  Now I was doing project management for the development of a new kind of catheter.  This catheter is to be implanted in late-stage cancer patients to drain the pleural fluid that builds up around their lungs. Leading a project whose objective was to launch a product required me to develop new skillsets.  I had members on my team from non-engineering functions: regulatory, marketing, medical affairs. I also had to work with non-research functions like manufacturing and quality. I needed to develop business savvy, learning to think about the non-technical challenges that are required to commercialize products. I greatly enjoy being a leader in New Product Development teams and looking ahead, I hope to continue to grow as a leader in medical technology development.

Reflection on Time Spent at UM

I was happy to do a BSE in Mechanical Engineering, which taught me very good fundamental engineering skills.  It’s a very versatile major.  Doing an MSE and Ph.D. in Biomedical Engineering helped me specialize, and I see the power of Biomedical Engineering as enabling me to contribute creatively in highly interdisciplinary environments.  You can sit in a meeting with engineers, scientists, and clinicians and bridge the discussion among all of them.

Favorite Class

The most valuable class I ever took was ME 395, the junior-year lab class.  It was very tough, but the technical communication skills it taught me are what helped me stand out throughout my career.

Favorite Student Orgs

I was highly involved in student organizations throughout undergrad and grad school, and this was hugely impactful in my life.  I met the girl who went on to become my wife in Ingenieros.  I developed leadership skills through Epeians and Engineering Student Council, sometimes the hard way through mistakes, but better to make those mistakes in school than later.  I built strong networks that aid me to this day, and have many continuing friendships through them.

Career Timeline

  • Texas A&M
  • Becton Dickinson (BD)
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Rachel Sun

University of Michigan, BS Cellular & Molecular Biology, 2018

University of Michigan, MSE Biomedical Engineering, 2019

Pall Corporation

R&D Leadership Associate

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Career Summary

I am currently in a 2-year rotational program at Pall, focusing on R&D in biotechnology. I am approaching the tail end of my first rotation in new product development and will be moving into Pall’s biotechnology automation and analytics team. 

There are several projects that have been helpful to me. First and foremost was my time in BME’s graduate medical device product development course. I presented this project during my interview and I’m certain it was key in securing this job. It provided me with a strong background in understanding how products, not just medical devices, are developed and prepared me for the processes used at Pall. Second have been hard math/experimental based courses. Much of my work focuses on designing DOEs, executing, and making sense of the data. 

How does your Master’s degree differentiate you from others?

A graduate degree rounds out your education, you are aware of more than your peers and can draw from that pool to augment things you’ve learned in your undergraduate.

Advice to Students

Take courses with “skills” if you are dead-set on going into engineering/industry even if it’s not directly relevant to your program (i.e. CAD, programming, regulatory process, experimental design, STATISTICS, etc.). 

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Bill Lloyd

University of Michigan, BSE Biomedical Engineering, 2005

University of Michigan, MSE Biomedical Engineering, 2010

University of Michigan, PhD Biomedical Engineering, 2013

Terumo Heart Inc.

Senior Engineer II

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Career Summary

During my Ph.D., I worked with CRLT-Engin and at the Business School. After graduating with my Ph.D., I pursued three different interests – my scientific interests with a post-doc position in the Department of Chemistry, my teaching interests through an Instructional Consultant position at CRLT-Engin, and my coaching interests through a position at the Innovatrium. Through working on diversified projects and multi-disciplinary teams, I found avenues to pursue many of my interests professionally. It helped me understand what skills I had developed during my academic career and forced me to figure out what unique skills I had. Above all else, I found that I love problem-solving in any incarnation. After several years of post-graduation at UM, I decided to pursue an industry position in medical device design. I purposefully selected a small company that would function more like a start-up, enabling me to diversify my skills while experiencing numerous phases of the design process, from requirement development through validation.

Advice to Students

My advice to students is to think proactively. As you prepare for your next step in life, consider your competencies on a graph. You will have a range of competencies, from below average, to average, to above average. Understanding this spectrum is the first step because it will help you hone in on your unique abilities. The next step is to set a plan for improvement. Progress forward is often defined as eliminating your weaknesses or doubling down on your strengths. I think finding the middle is better. If the goal is to make forward progress, consider your skills like an inchworm. Find your strengths, identify how to improve, and move the head of the inchworm forward. Find your weaknesses, identify how to improve, and move the tail of the inchworm forward. By repeating this process, your inchworm is always moving forward. If you are pursuing a job, identify the skills that you possess that will immediately help the employer. When contacting the hiring manager, clearly state what you can help with and how you will do it. If possible, use projects you’ve completed to demonstrate those skills.

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Heidi Nielsen

University of Michigan, BSE Biomedical Engineering, 2007

University of Michigan, MSE Biomedical Engineering, 2008

Wayne State University, MBA, 2011

Emergent Biosolutions

Senior Manager, Manufacturing Operations

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Career Summary

I currently manage a manufacturing plant, including staffing, value stream planning, improvements, and quality system work for a cGMP pharmaceutical vaccine production. I have worked for a small biotechnology company to perform process development and validation of a human stem cell-based product to treat cardiac myopathy and limb ischemia. I also worked at Pfizer researching small molecule cardio antagonists in animal models to identify new vasodilation compounds for cardiac treatment.

In 2017, I implemented a new state of the art serialization equipment to track and trace the full supply chain of the distributed vaccine. In 2017-2018, I transitioned the manufacturing staff into a new high throughput manufacturing capacity and implemented complete resource and staffing model changes. I also contributed to the Emergency Use Authorization of a new vaccine to protect against anthrax attacks.

What excites you about your career?

Working with a diverse group of people to solve challenging problems in the pursuit of improving healthcare and protect human life

Reflection on Time Spent at UM

  • Likes: I love the campus and all of the team-based projects. The degree coursework was interesting and challenging. The analytical techniques and ways of problem-solving are directly applicable to the real world. The U of M culture is so warm and exciting.  
  • Dislikes: Some courses didn’t always seem relevant or seemed to be unnecessarily difficult, requiring a huge grading curve. I didn’t really understand the purpose of making exams so difficult that such large curves were needed. I received a lot of parking tickets too, so the parking and North Campus bus schedule could be problematic.
  • Favorite Events: UofM football and hockey games, tailgating
  • Favorite Student Orgs: Phi Sigma Rho sorority, BME Society
  • Favorite Classes: senior capstone course in BME

Advice for students

Enjoy your time in college, work hard and play hard. Working full time is nice but not nearly as fun at being in college, so be sure to reflect and have fun.

What do you like to do outside of work?

Camp, go hiking, play soccer and frisbee golf, read

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Jeffrey Meng

University of Michigan, BSE Biomedical Engineering, 2007

University of Michigan, MSE Biomedical Engineering, 2008

U.S. Public Health Service / U.S. Food and Drug Administration

Director of Investigations Branch

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Career Summary

I have spent the last 10 years working for the US FDA in various field operations related capacities as a Drug Specialist Investigator, Supervisory Investigator, and now Director of Investigations Branch. As the Director of Investigations Branch for the Division of Pharmaceutical Quality Operations III within the Office of Regulatory Affairs for FDA, I am responsible for all pharmaceutical operations within the US Midwest which typically consists of manufacturing facility inspections, investigations, and sample collections. My branch currently consists of nearly 40 investigators, supervisory investigators, and support staff who perform these operations. 

My most memorable experiences were those as a Drug Specialist Investigator for FDA. Highlights of these include a short rotation stationed at the FDA China Office out of Shanghai, China, providing courtroom testimony to support a pharmaceutical facility shutdown, and leading a facility inspection that resulted in public health protections that included a judicial consent decree of permanent injunction entered against the facility and recalls of drug products distributed to 15 different countries. 

What excites you about your career?

I am passionate about the work we do every day at the FDA to provide safe and effective medicines for the American consumer and protect public health. 

Have you received any awards? Name and year received?

The FDA and the US PHS have recognized my professional contributions with several awards. Examples include an FDA Outstanding Service Award in 2014, a USPHS Meritorious Service Medal in 2018, and multiple group awards throughout the years. 

Reflection on Time Spent at UM

  • Likes: I loved the campus atmosphere and opportunities for exposure to a variety of experiences. Go Blue!
  • Dislike: I don’t have any strong memories of my time at U of M that I didn’t like. 
  • Favorite Classes: My senior and graduate innovative design courses through the BME department. These courses forced us to apply our engineering background and knowledge to technical problems, communicate effectively with relevant stakeholders, and present tangible proposals, mimicking professional career experiences. 

Advice for Students

Be open to what the future might bring. When some doors close, other opportunities may present themselves that were even better than imagined. I had always thought I would either enter industry as an engineer or perhaps medical school, but I am thrilled with the events that did not seem ideal at the time, but lead me to work at the FDA and for the US Public Health Service. 

What do you like to do outside of work?

With two young kids under the age of 3, I enjoy spending my time outside work playing with them and watching them grow. 

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Andrew Scott

University of Michigan, BSE Materials Science and Engineering, 2001 

University of Michigan, MSE Biomedical Engineering, 2001 

University of Michigan,  MHSA Health Management and Policy, 2016

Michigan Energy Department Improvement Collaborative

Program Manager

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Career Summary

My first job out of school was as an R&D engineer at a small biodevice start-up in Ann Arbor. After funding cuts, I scrambled for a new position and ended up in the field of Intraoperative Neuromonitoring. I worked in many roles in that field ranging from front line neuromonitoring technologist to QA supervisor to Education Coordinator to Clinical Operations Director. During this progression, I realized that I had a passion for our healthcare system and was fascinated by how we could improve delivery, efficiency, and cost of care so I went back to school to get my MHSA in Health Management and Policy. I now work as the Program Manager for a 20 hospital member statewide collaborative working to improve patient care in the Emergency Department setting throughout the state of Michigan. 

I really believe that the combination of an engineering mindset and education along with real clinical experience puts me in a unique place to be able to help think through the real process problems that our healthcare system has from a logical and methodological approach while also using my clinical experience to understand that in the real world of taking care of patients, what makes sense in a conference room doesn’t always make sense on the floor or in the unit.

How does your Master’s degree differentiate you from others?

Having an advanced engineering education has been an incredible tool for me to help see problems from all angles and to jump in and help solve them.

Advice to Students

Take your time to find the work setting that matches your true interests. As much as possible, take the time to go to the “Gemba” and do the actual work you are helping design. Focus on understanding the how and why – you can always look up the what. 

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Kristen Wolff

University of Michigan, BSE Biomedical Engineering, 2007 

University of Michigan, MSE Biomedical Engineering, 2008

Duke University School of Law

LSAT, GRE, California Bar Exam, Patent Bar Exam

University of Michigan

Assoc. Director of Licensing, Tech Transfer

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Career Summary

I currently work to help protect and commercialize biomedical technologies developed by researchers and clinicians at the University. When a new invention is created, I assess its market potential and patentability, craft patent strategy, market the technology to potential commercialization partners, and connect inventors with commercialization resources. When the right industry partner is identified, I draft and negotiate contracts to enable commercial development of the technology.

I worked for 6 years as a patent attorney and consultant, managing the IP portfolios of medical devices and digital health companies. During that time, I lived in San Diego, the Bay Area, and Seattle. I started my career as a patent attorney at Knobbe Martens, an IP boutique law firm. I then moved to Foley & Lardner, an international law firm with over 1,000 attorneys, before joining two other University of Michigan alumnae leading a startup IP consulting firm.

What excites you about your career?

Working with some of the leading researchers in the world is a real privilege. I have the opportunity to continuously learn about brand new technologies before they are even published. Many of the technologies in my portfolio are truly revolutionary, for example, showing promise in eliminating tumors non-invasively, repairing injured spinal cords, and minimizing brain damage following strokes. The life-changing potential of these technologies keeps me motivated to help move them out of the lab and into clinics and the marketplace.

Reflection on Time Spent at UM

  • Likes: So many. Here are a few. Freshman year Welcome Week–Everyone was new and looking for friends and classes hadn’t started yet, so people were particularly welcoming and fun. Dorm living sophomore year–As sophomores, we got to choose our rooms, so many of my friends and I lived on the same floor. There were lots of innocent pranks and late-night conversations. Also: playing intramural sports (especially inner tube water polo!), exercising in the Rec Center, and running on the wooded trails of the Arb.   
  • Dislikes: Exams–they might be necessary, but they’re never fun. Studying for them outside on the Diag on sunny April days made them a little better. 
  • Favorite Student Orgs: Forming M-HEAL with my friends and competing on the U-M Mock Trial team

Advice for Students

Get to know your professors–they’re really interesting people. Attend office hours and ask them about their research and lives. 

Career Timeline

  • University of Michigan
  • Aurora Consulting LLC
  • Foley & Lardner LLP
  • Knobbe Martens Olson & Bear LLP
  • Duke Start-Up Ventures Clinic
  • United States Senate Foreign Relations Committee
  • Institute for Justice
  • Altarum
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Michael Ron

University of Michigan, BSE Mechanical Engineering, 2005

University of Michigan, MSE Biomedical Engineering, 2006

Nuvasive

Staff Quality Engineer

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Career Summary

I started out as a project engineer in 2006 at Stryker Orthopedics in Mahwah, NJ, designing hip replacements for ~7 years. I then moved to San Diego and have been a Quality Engineer for ~6 years at Nuvasive (a spine fusion company).

Day to day, I work with Research & Development to mitigate risks in their designs by doing tolerance analyses, conduct physical implant testing using Instron/MTS machines, resolve non-conformances when manufacturers make products out-of-spec, and help mitigate risks in the entire workstream of production (bar stock through machining to cleaning and packaging).

Advice to Students:

  • Learn about machining processes (milling, lathing, laser-marking, 3D metal printing, 3D plastic printing)
  • Learn how to technically communicate both in writing and speaking.  I remember rolling my eyes at this in Eng101 in 2001, but it is very important.
  • Learn how to do tolerance analyses. All engineers at medical device companies need to do this A LOT to ensure that instruments will always work with implants.
  • Learn Solidworks or Creo well.
  • Learn FEA or at least the concepts behind why it is important.

Career Timeline

  • Stryker Orthopedics | Mahwah, NJ
  • Nuvasive | San Diego, CA
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Mitchell Rohde

University of Michigan, BSE Electrical Engineering, 1994

University of Michigan, MSE Electrical Engineering Systems, 1996

University of Michigan, MSE Biomedical Engineering, 1997

University of Michigan, Ph.D. Biomedical Engineering, 2000

Quantum Signal

Chief Executive Officer (CEO)

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Career Summary

My path was (and still is) one of an entrepreneur. I co-founded Quantum Signal while finishing up my Ph.D. in 1999, hoping to bring signal and image processing algorithms into wider application in a variety of fields of application. In the earliest years, the company scraped along doing consulting and minor development work for a very small number of clients, and I was the only full-time team member. As time went on, QS grew into a more full-fledged engineering research and development organization, taking on projects from both the government and the commercial sector, in fields as varied as automotive, defense, consumer products, and even entertainment! 

As the company grew, my role also grew from doing technical work and some business functions to being much more focused on the vision and business aspects. This included learning how to be a manager and leader, filling roles (such as business development, public speaker, and more) that were critical to growing the business into what it is today. Every project, program, and customer had (and still has) special nuances, thus in our business, it was never the same game twice and I am always learning and evolving. Working with team members that have experience from prior lives has also been helpful, and I am deeply appreciative of what I have and will continue to, learn from them. It was much, much harder to start and successfully run a small business than I ever expected when we first set out over 20 years ago, but the experience has been excellent and I will never regret choosing the path that I did.

Reflection on Time spent at UM

When I was in school, we worked on walking robots, created and ran a bagel stand, held weekly tech-talks, pulled engineering pranks, and generally burned the candle at three ends day and night, and that is exactly what someone should be doing as an engineering student. 

Favorite Student Orgs

IEEE- Students interested in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Eta Kappa Nu -Honors Society for Electrical and Computer Engineers, Tau Beta Pi- Engineering Honors Society

Advice to Students

  • I was a heavy participant in a number of student organizations and strongly recommend it to anyone in school. They provide an outstanding way to build experience and create friendships and contacts that will last far longer than you might expect. 
  • If I were to provide really solid advice it is this: dig deep into your engineering education and commit, give it 150%, don’t squander that which is a resource you cannot buy more of (time), and most importantly, have fun!!!
Image of Sahar Rahmani

Sahar Rahmani

University of Michigan, BSE Biomedical Engineering, 2010

University of Michigan, MSE Biomedical Engineering, 2011

University of Michigan, BSE Biomedical Engineering, 2015

Gilead Sciences

Research Scientist

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Career Summary

I started doing research when I was a freshman at UM through the UROP project and continued in the lab I was in through my second year. During my third year, I received the Sarah Maria Parker fellowship and worked in a lab that worked on developing multi-functional nanoparticles for drug delivery applications. I fell in love with the research and lab and decided to stay for my Ph.D. I was originally a pre-med student, but I really liked research and teaching and decided to become a faculty member. As the next step in my career path, I became a postdoctoral fellow at Harvard doing research in regenerative medicine, immunology, and tissue engineering. 

Reflection on Time Spent at UM

I loved the variety of organizations/groups that were available at Michigan; you are bound to find one you like. And, in the rare case that you don’t, or if you have a new idea, you can always make your own group. I also liked how open and understanding the administration was in the Engineering school and how willing they were to listen. 

  • Favorite Student Orgs: I was part of the USAB (Undergraduate Student Advisory Board) in UM Engineering and I was always amazed at how much they valued our thoughts and suggestions and that they actually did something about them. 
Image of Scott Merz

Scott Merz

Duke University, BSE Electrical and Biomedical Engineering, 1987

University of Michigan, MS Biomedical Engineering, 1989

University of Michigan, Ph.D. Biomedical Engineering, 1993

MC3 Cardiopulmonary

President & CEO

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Career Summary

What excites you about your career?

Contributing to the medical field; collaborating with healthcare workers.

Major Career Highlights

I started and sold three med device spinoff companies.

Awards

  • UM Alumni Merit Award for BME; 2014

Reflection on Time Spent at UM

  • Likes: Diversity of Research
  • Favorite class: BME Instrumentation

Advice for Students

Visit businesses as much as possible; seek internships

What do you like to do outside of work?

Music, outdoor sports, reading

Career Timeline

  • MC3 Cardiopulmonary
  • TruEnamel
  • Vasoptic Medical, Inc.
  • Exatherm, Inc.
  • Seraph Biosciences, Inc
  • Michigan Critical Care Consultants, Inc
  • Millipede, Inc
  • Accord Biomaterials, Inc
  • Novalung GmbH
U-M healthcare workers

Industries & Occupations

U-M healthcare workers
  • Medical Device Manufacturing
  • Pharmaceutical industry
  • Computation and Modeling
  • Electronic/computer products industry
  • Federal Government
  • Scientific Research
  • Business Management
  • Medicine
  • Neural Engineering
  • Imaging and Biophotonics
  • Prosthetics Design and Development
students testing neuro research

Companies

students testing neuro research
  • Stryker
  • Bio-Rad
  • Boston Scientific
  • Johnson & Johnson
  • Kimberly-Clark
  • Merch & Co., Inc.
  • National Institute of Health
  • Pfizer Corporation
  • Procter & gamble
  • Eli Lilly
  • Ford Motor Co.
  • GE Healthcare
  • Siemens
  • NeuroNexus Technologies
Members of UMTRI Assistant Research Scientist Monica Jone’s research group run a study to help people avoid and treat motion sickness in autonomous vehicles Bruns' lab performs in vivo studies to develop interfaces with the peripheral nervous system. In these studies they seek to understand how the nervous system works and to obtain functional control over an end organ. In general they focus on autonomic organs, including a primary lab goal of restoring bladder function through stimulation and recording from specific nerves. They are "planning" surgical steps towards implanting bladder catheters and also placing electrodes of different types (cuff, penetrating) on to their target nerves. In their procedures, it is important to maintain proper animal vitals, just like for people undergoing surgery. May 9th, 2017. Ann Arbor, MI.
University of Michigan professor James Geiger use a FlexDex instrument for the first time in a surgery at the University of Michigan Hospital. Ann Arbor, MI Friday, Jan. 27, 2017. Minimally Invasive Surgery (MIS) is performed via small incisions on the patient's body, resulting in reduced pain, blood-loss and recovery time. Existing instrument technologies for MIS either lack dexterity and intuitive control, or are very expensive. FlexDex's platform technology precisely translates the surgeon’s hand, wrist, and arm movements from outside the patient into corresponding movements of an end-effector inside the patient's body. Based on a simple, purely mechanical, and affordable design, FlexDex greatly enhances the capabilities of all MIS instruments and endoscopes. FlexDex's core technology is the outcome of basic research and innovations in parallel kinematics, virtual center of rotation, and flexure mechanisms in the Precision Systems Design Lab at the University of Michigan. Professors Shorya Awtar (Mechanical Engineering) and James Geiger (Surgery), along with medical device entrepreneur Greg Bowles, co-founded FlexDex Surgical to translate this research into surgeon-friendly medical products.

Salaries

Discover the value of a master’s degree!  On average, U-M graduates with a master’s degree in an engineering field can earn 15-25% more than those with a bachelor’s degree in engineering.  Use the link below to research average salaries based on a U-M engineering master’s degree, experience level, and desired work location.